As machines become intelligent, where does India stand?

Machine learning is the science of learning to do tasks by observing examples. It is transforming the world by enabling machines do all sorts of ‘intelligent’ tasks such as understanding images, human speech, predicting preferences, diseases and many others. With tremendous amount of data, interconnectedness, sophisticated algorithms and huge processing power in small devices, machines do things which were beyond their reach until recently. On the other hand, machines are still unable to do many tasks which humans do effortlessly, say understanding a story – this constitutes the next big challenge for machines, well, the humans that build these machines!

In some way, it has never been so exciting! Where should India be, as machines are becoming more intelligent? It is simple – it should be making the most of the opportunity. We need to participate and contribute in high quality research, innovation and also convert new results into effective business models.  The opportunity is global – the location of a digital business doesn’t constrain its market – a company in a Bangalore or a Gurgaon could serve the US market, the Europe market or even the whole world. Machine learning is not just a scientific or an academic pursuit. The economy and society can get great returns by the research and innovation in the area.

But are we there yet? Where are we placed in the global scene in both, academic and industrial research?

Read the full article here – http://ml-india.org/where-does-india-stand-machine-learning/

On automated assessments – State of the art and goals

In fall 2014, we organized ASSESS, the first workshop on data mining for educational assessment and feedback, at KDD 2014 [link]. The workshop brought together a total of 80 participants including education psychologists, computer scientists and practitioners under one roof and led to a thoughtful discussion. We have put together a white paper which captures our key discussions from the workshop. The paper primarily discusses why assessments are important, what is the state of the art and what goals should we pursue as a community. It is a brief exposition and serves as a starting point for a discussion to set the agenda for the next decade.

On automated assessments - State of the art and goals

Why are assessments important?

Automated and semi-automated assessments are a key to scaling learning, validating pedagogical innovations, and delivering socio-economic benefits of learning.

  • Practice and Feedback: Whether considering large-scale learning for vocational training or non-vocational education, automating delivery of high-quality content is not enough. We need to be able to automate or semi-automate assessments for formative purposes. Substantial evidence indicates that learning is enhanced through doing assignments and obtaining feedback on one’s attempts. In addition, the so-called “testing effect” demonstrates that repeated testing with feedback enhances students long-term retention of information. By automating assessments, students can get real-time feedback on their learning in a way that scales with the number of students. Automated assessments may become, in some sense, “automated teaching assistants”.
  • Education Pedagogy: There is a great need to understand which teaching/learning/delivery models of pedagogy are better than others, especially with new emerging modes and platforms for education. To understand the impact of and compare different pedagogies, we need assessments that can summatively measure learning outcomes precisely and accurately. Without valid assessments, empirical research on learning and pedagogy becomes questionable.
  • Learning to socio-economic mobility: For learners that seek vocational benefits, there need to be scalable ways of measuring and certifying learning so that they may garner socio-economic benefits from what they’ve learnt. There need to be scalable ways of measuring learning so as to predict the KSOAs (knowledge, skills and other abilities) of learners to do specific tasks. This will help both learners and employers by driving meritocracy in labor markets through reduced information asymmetries and transaction costs. Matching of people to jobs can become more efficient.

We look forward to hearing your thoughts on the paper! Do feel free to write to research@aspiringminds.com

This is an excerpt from the white paper ‘On Assessments – State of the art and goals’, which had contributions from Varun Aggarwal, Steven Stemler, Lav Varshney and Divyanshu Vats, co-organizers, ASSESS 2014 at KDD. The full paper can be accessed here.

Paper accepts at ICML and KDD!

Some more good news!

Soon after our recent acceptance of our spoken English grading work at ACL, our work on learning models for job selection and personalized feedback gets accepted at the workshop Machine Learning for Education at ICML! Some results from this paper were discussed in one of our previous posts. The tool was built five years ago and has since helped a couple of million students get personalized feedback and aided 200+ companies hire better. I shall also be giving an invited talk at this workshop.

Earlier this month, we also got a paper at KDD accepted, which builds on our previous work in spontaneous speech evaluation. We find how well we can grade spontaneous speech of natives of different countries and also analyze the benefits the industry gets with such an evaluation system.

Busy year ahead it seems – paper presentations at France, Beijing, Australia and finally New Jersey, where we’re organizing the second edition of ASSESS, our annual workshop on data mining for educational assessment and feedback. It’s being organized at ICDM 2015 this winter. July 20th is the submission deadline for the workshop. Here is a list of submissions we saw in our workshop last year, at KDD. Spread the word!

– Varun