The first interactive US Skill Demand Map- A big data approach

Jobseekers wish to know what skills are required by the industry in their region and also, what skills pay the most. So do institutions of higher and vocational education. Unfortunately, there is no information about this. It is considered hard to collate such information and the old school way of running surveys with corporations is time-consuming, expensive and mired by subjectivity.

We went after this problem the big data way – we scrapped some 4 million job openings from the web for the US, automatically matched them to our taxonomy of 1064 job roles and the 200+ skills required for these job roles. What did we get out of this? The US Skill Demand Map – For each state in the US, we know what percent of open jobs require a given skill and how much does a skill pay. For instance, see the Heat Map below — it shows how much does the software engineering skill pays in different US states.  All this is generated automatically and be updated in minutes every month based on the current open jobs in the market!

 Figure 1: Compensation for software engineering skill

Figure 1: Compensation for software engineering skill

This map is interactive. A jobseeker can enter his key skill to find which states demand it the most and which states pay for it the most. Additionally, s/he can scroll across the map to find the demand/compensation in each state for a given skill. On the other hand, the candidate can enter a state and find out top paying and high-demand skills in the state. Try it now!

Such analysis also helps us uncover policy trends (See our report). We found that agreeableness and finger dexterity are the most in demand skills after Information Gathering and Synthesis, which has the highest demand. One may see in the map below the states which have more percent of jobs requiring agreeableness and those where finger dexterity is required more often.

 

Figure 2: Skills in highest demand in each U.S. state (other than Information Gathering & Synthesis)

Figure 2: Skills in highest demand in each U.S. state (other than Information Gathering & Synthesis)

On the other hand, we can find the states which have the most demand and pay the most for say, analytical skills. New York pays the most for the skill, whereas the highest percent of jobs in Virginia need analytical skills. (See Figure 3)

Figure 3: Heat maps for demand and compensation for analytical skills

Figure 3: Heat maps for demand and compensation for analytical skills

The U.S. Skill Demand Map fills a major information gap in the labor market. To our knowledge, this is the first effort to objectively present the demand for skills across US states to aid better decision-making by job seekers. It is based on objective data, it is quick, accurate and user-friendly.

Trying to understand what skill to gain or how best to utilize your skills? Use our interactive map now!

-Varun

What AM Research told you in 2015 – the data science way?

As the year came to an end, we looked back on what we shared with the world in 2015. As data nerds, we pushed all our blog articles in to an NLP engine to cluster them to identify key themes. Given the small sample size and challenges to find semantic similarity in our specialized area, we waded through millions of unsupervised samples through deep learning with a Bayesian framework, ran it on a cluster of GPUs for a month…yada yada. Well, for some problems it is just that humans can do things easily and efficiently; so that is what we actually did.

The key themes were:

Grading of programs – 4 posts

We need to grade programs better to be able to give automated feedback to learners and help companies hire more efficiently and expand the pool considered for hiring. We at AM dream to have an automated teaching assistant – we think it is possible and will be disruptive. Thus we dedicated 4 of our posts on telling you about automatically grading programs and its impact.

The tree of program difficulty – We found that we could determine the empirical difficulty of a programming problem based on the data structures it uses, the control structures used and its return type, among other parameters. We used these features in a nice decision tree to predict how many test takers would answer the question correctly, and we predicted with a correlation of 0.81! This tells us about human cognition, helps improve pedagogy and also helps generate the right questions to have a balanced test. And this is just the tip of the iceberg. Second, we approached the same by looking at the difficulty of test-cases and their inter correlation. We understood what conceptual mistakes people make and also got a recipe to make better test cases for programs and had insights on how to score them. For instance, we found that a trailing comma in a test case can make it unnecessarily difficult!

Finding super good programmers – Given these thoughts on how to construct a programming test and score it, we showed you how all this intelligence put together with our super semantic machine learning algorithm, we can spot 16% good programmers missed by test case based measures. Additionally, we also found automatically the super good ones writing efficient and maintainable code. So please say a BIG NO to test case based programming assessment tools!

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Reproduced from “AI can help you spot the right programmers”. It shows a test case metric misses 16% good programmers. Furthermore AI can help spot 20% super good coders

Pre-reqs to learn programming - Stepping back, we tried determining who could learn programming through a short duration course. We found that it was a function of a person’s logical ability and English but not did not depend on her/his quantitative skills. Interestingly, we found that a basic exposure to programming language could compensate for lower logical ability in predicting a successful student who could learn programming. A data way to find course prerequisites!

Building a machine learning ecosystem – 3 posts

Catching them young! We designed a cognitively manageable hands-on supervised learning exercise for 5th-9th graders. We helped kids, in three workshops spread across different cities, make fairly accurate friend predictors with great success! We think data science is going to become a horizontal skill across job roles and want to find ways to get it into schools, universities and informal education.

“Exams. I would take my exam results, from the report card of every year. And then I will make it on excel and then I will remember the grades and the one I get more grades I will take a gift” [sic.]

flashcard

Reproduced from datasciencekids.org. Whom will you befriend? Can machine learning models devised by high school kids predict this?

The ML India ecosystem – Our next victims were those in universities. We launched ml-india.org to catalyse the Indian machine learning ecosystem. Given India’s very low research output in machine learning, we have put together a resource center and a mail list to promote machine learning. We also declared ourselves as self-styled evaluators of machine learning research in India and promise to share monthly updates.

Employment outcome data release – We recently launched AMEO, our employability outcome data set at CODS. This unique data set has assessment details, education and demographic details of close to 6000 students together with their employment outcomes – first job designation and salary. This can tell us so much about the labor market to guide students and also identify gaps – to guide policy makers. We are keenly looking forward to what wonderful insights we get from the crowd! Come, contribute!

Pat our back! – 3 posts 

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Reproduced from “Work on spoken English grading gets accepted at ACL, AM-R&D going to Beijing!”. We describe our system that mixes machine learning with crowdsourcing to do spontaneous speech evaluation

We told you about our KDD and ACL papers on automatic spoken English evaluation – the first semi-automated automated grading of free speech. We loved mixing crowdsourcing with machine learning – a cross between peer and machine grading – to do super reliable automated evaluation.

And then our ICML workshop paper talked about how to build models of ‘employability’ – interpretable, theoretically plausible yet non-linear models which could predict outcome based on grades. More than 200 organizations have benefited by using this model in recruiting talent and they do way better than linear models!

Other posts

On the posts off these three clusters, we told you about –
Why we exist – why we need data science to promote labor market meritoracy

– The state of the art and goals for assessment research for the next decade (See ASSESS 2015)

Our work on classifying with 80-80 accuracy for 1500+ classes

It has been an interesting year at AM, learning from all our peers and contributing our bit to research, while using it to build super products. We promise to treat you with a lot more interesting stuff in open-response grading, labor market standardizing and understanding next year. Stay tuned to this space!

Varun